A Framework for the Legalization and Regulation of Cannabis in Canada

By | Drug Policy, News Media

The Final Report of the Task Force on Cannabis Legalization and Regulation


TFMLR Dec. 13, 2016

Table of Contents

Foreword

Executive Summary

Chapter 1: Introduction
Our mandate
The Canadian context
A global perspective
Setting the frame
Public policy objectives
Engagement process
Guiding principles

Chapter 2: Minimizing Harms of Use
Introduction: a public health approach
Minimum age
Promotion, advertising and marketing restrictions
Cannabis-based edibles and other products
THC potency
Tax and price
Public education
Prevention and treatment
Workplace safety

Chapter 3: Establishing a Safe and Responsible Supply Chain
Introduction
Production
Distribution
Retail
Personal cultivation

Chapter 4: Enforcing Public Safety and Protection
Introduction
Illegal activities
Personal possession
Place of use
Impaired driving

Chapter 5: Medical Access
Introduction
One system or two?
Access
Affordability
Products
Public safety
Evidence and research

Chapter 6: Implementation
Capacity
Oversight
Co-ordination
Communication

Annex 1: Biographies of Task Force on Cannabis Legalization and Regulation Members
Annex 2: Terms of Reference
Annex 3: Acknowledgements
Annex 4: Discussion Paper ‘Toward the Legalization, Regulation and Restriction of Access to Marijuana’
Annex 5: Executive Summary: Analysis of consultation input submitted to the Task Force on Cannabis Legalization and Regulation

http://healthycanadians.gc.ca/task-force-marijuana-groupe-etude/framework-cadre/index-eng.php


Cannabis & impaired driving

By | Drug Policy

Cannabis and impaired driving

We must all be responsible adults especially *law enforcement and other professionals in the media and health care fields and seriously look at and listen to the scientific evidence.

Cannabis keeps getting compared to the toxic (deadly) drug alcohol. Cannabis is not toxic. Cannabis and alcohol are just not the same. Under the influence behaviours are not the same as alcohol or pharmaceutical drugs for the most part.

Daily medical cannabis consumers generally gain experience and tolerance fairly quickly. People would not be impaired if they took an aspirin for a headache the same can be said for most daily medical cannabis consumers.

Several years now pharmaceutical drug advertisements have included warnings about possible side affects that could cause impairment, statements like, know how our drug affects you before operating motor vehicles or equipment. In other words consumption does not automatically equal you’re impaired.

Distracted driving and walking is impaired behaviours. Parents drive while distracted by their children. Pet owners drive while distracted by their pets. Using a cell phone. Lack of sleep, human emotions, stress, mental health and more are all part of the important impaired issue.

Education based on scientific evidence only without the typical proven reefer madness nonsense.

*Irresponsible law enforcement and media professionals

See Dr. Susan C. Boyd, a B.C. researcher’s book “Killer Weed: Marijuana Grow Ops, Media and Justice”. about how law enforcement and media are not telling the facts.
Google Dr. Susan C. Boyd’s “4 Reefer madness is governmental” for more.
Note: Dr. Susan C. Boyd is a member of Liberal government “Task Force on Marijuana Legalization and Regulation”

June 3, 2016
Motor Mouth: Hysteria over ‘high driving’ is all half-baked
Marijuana, by most measures, is not in any way the scourge that alcohol is
http://driving.ca/auto-news/news/motor-mouth-hysteria-over-high-driving-is-half-baked

August 5, 2014
Since marijuana legalization, highway fatalities in Colorado are at near-historic lows
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-watch/wp/2014/08/05/since-marijuana-legalization-highway-fatalities-in-colorado-are-at-near-historic-lows/

April 6, 2012
Marijuana Users Are Safer Drivers Than Non-Marijuana Users, New Study Shows
http://www.prweb.com/releases/2012/4/prweb9375729.htm

November, 2011
Medical Marijuana Laws, Traffic Fatalities, and Alcohol Consumption
D. Mark Anderson University of Montana and Daniel Rees University of Colorado
Abstract:
16 states have passed medical marijuana laws, yet very little is known about their effects. Using state-level data, we examine the relationship between medical marijuana laws and a variety of outcomes. Legalization of medical marijuana is associated with increased use of marijuana among adults, but not among minors. In addition, legalization is associated with a nearly 9 percent decrease in traffic fatalities, most likely to due to its impact on alcohol consumption. Our estimates provide strong evidence that marijuana and alcohol are substitutes.
calgary420.ca/pdf/driving/dp6112.pdf

2007
CANADA SAFTEY COUNCIL
DRIVERS ON POT – ISSUES AND OPTIONS
HOW CANNABIS USE AFFECTS DRIVING
Alcohol causes more impairment than cannabis and carries a demonstrably higher crash risk. Drivers under the influence of cannabis are acutely aware of their impairment. They consciously try to drive more cautiously, for example by slowing down, focusing their attention and avoiding risks. Drinking drivers show more risk taking and aggression in their driving, have no insight into their impairment, and do not try to compensate.
https://canadasafetycouncil.org/traffic-safety/how-cannabis-use-affects-driving

2003
CANADA SAFTEY COUNCIL
HOW DOES POT AFFECT DRIVERS?
The psychoactive chemical in marijuana is tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). THC has a very different effect from alcohol. Pot users are acutely aware of their impairment – that is, they feel “high” – and some try to compensate by driving more cautiously.
https://canadasafetycouncil.org/traffic-safety/drivers-pot-issues-and-options

2002
REPORT OF THE SENATE SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON ILLEGAL DRUGS – SenateReport.ca
CANNABIS: OUR POSITION FOR A CANADIAN PUBLIC POLICY
Chapter: 8 Driving under the influence of cannabis

• Cannabis alone, particularly in low doses, has little effect on the skills involved in automobile driving.
• Cannabis, particularly in the doses that match typical doses for regular users, has a negative impact on decision time and trajectory.
• Cannabis leads to a more cautious style of driving.
• The effects of cannabis when combined with alcohol are more significant than for alcohol alone.
http://www.parl.gc.ca/Content/SEN/Committee/371/ille/rep/repfinalvol1part4-e.htm


Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulations (Aug. 24)

By | Drug Policy, Erb4Herb, Political

Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulations (ACMPR)

Legalize Yes

August 24, 2016

Part 2 — Production for Own Medical Purposes and Production by a Designated Person

Part 2 of the ACMPR sets out a registration framework that allows for personal-use and designated production of cannabis (including cultivation of plants and alteration of products) for medical purposes.

Note: The majority of Part 2 incorporates the requirements of the former MMAR and relevant section 56 CDSA exemptions that respond to the decision in R. v. Smith with required modifications to incorporate the production, storage and possession of products other than dried marihuana or plants. New provisions that did not form part of the previous framework include the following:
•Proof of possession and registration can be demonstrated through a registration certificate issued by Health Canada.

• Starting materials (i.e. seeds and plants) can be obtained through licensed producers.

• Interim supply of cannabis (until plants are ready) can be obtained through licensed producers.

• Security measures do not need to be listed on the registration application, but those registering to possess and produce cannabis must declare that security measures are in place to keep plants and products secure.

• Information sharing provisions have been expanded to enable proactive sharing of information on registered persons with P/T health care licensing authorities.

Grams Per Day = Plant Count

Producing cannabis safety and security
Information bulletin: safety and security considerations when producing cannabis for your own medical purposes

Applications for Production for Own Medical Purposes and Production by a Designated Person

http://healthycanadians.gc.ca/alt/pdf/drugs-products-medicaments-produits/buying-using-achat-utilisation/cannabis-medical/access-acces/personal-production-personnelle/registration-form-formulaire-inscription-eng.pdf

Guidance Document – Completing the Production for Own Medical Purposes and Production by a Designated Person Registration Form
http://healthycanadians.gc.ca/drugs-products-medicaments-produits/buying-using-achat-utilisation/cannabis-medical/access-acces/personal-production-personnelle/registration-instructions-inscription-eng.php

August 11, 2016 Understanding ACMPR
Understanding the New Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulations

Complete ACMPR Regulations
http://www.gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p2/2016/2016-08-24/html/sor-dors230-eng.php

@KF420

Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulations (Aug. 11)

By | Uncategorized

As of August 24, 2016, the Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulations (ACMPR) will replace the Marihuana for Medical Purposes Regulations (MMPR).

Legalize Yes

Understanding the New Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulations

Table of Contents

1. Introduction

2. Health Canada’s role

3. What it means for health care practitioners

4. What it means for licensed producers

5. What it means for individuals who require access to cannabis for medical purposes

6. What it means for law enforcement

7. What remains illegal

Fact Sheet: Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulations

Information bulletin: safety and security considerations when producing cannabis for your own medical purposes

NOTE: A start but still to restrictive. Limited to producing for only 2 people. 150 gram limit. No dispensaries. On the plus side they finally changed marihuana / marijuana to “cannabis”. Keith Fagin@KF420

Tousaw Law Corporation – August 11, 2016
Opinion on Health Canada’s ACMPR Announcement


Government of Canada moves forward on Marijuana Legalization and Regulation

By | Drug Policy, Political

Legalize Yes

Task force and public consultation to inform creation of a new system that will protect and inform Canadians
June 30, 2016
Ottawa, ON – Government of Canada – News Release

Participate by providing your input by completing the online consultation
Toward the Legalization, Regulation and Restriction of Access to Marijuana – Discussion Paper

or skip directly to participate in “online consultation”, locate the “Next” button at “Accessing Marijuana for Medical Purposes” “Privacy Notice”

or see “How to participate” “Provide feedback on minimizing harms of use by completing the “online consultation.” link above the “Previous” and “Next” buttons on the following five pages: 3.1 Minimizing harms of use, 3.2 Establishing a Safe and Responsible Production System, 3.3 Designing an appropriate distribution system, 3.4 Enforcing public safety and protection and 3.5 Accessing Marijuana for Medical Purposes

Contact,
Cannabis Legalization and Regulation Secretariat
Address locator 0602E
Ottawa, ON K1A 0K9

Email: cannabis@canada.ca


Note 3 Task Force members: Dr. Susan C. Boyd, Dr. Mark A Ware and Dr. Perry Kendall members of Liberal government “Task Force on Marijuana Legalization and Regulation”

Dr. Susan C. Boyd, Killer Weed: Marijuana Grow Ops, Media and Justice.
The Canadian Press — Dec. 25, 2013
Book by B.C. researcher says media, police not talking straight on pot

Susan C. Boyd, BC BookLook – April 17th, 2014 Reefer madness is governmental

Dr. Mark A Ware,
Executive Director of The Canadian Consortium for the Investigation of Cannabinoids (CCIC).

Dr. Perry Kendall, British Columbia Provincial Health Officer

November 10, 2014 Vancouver Sun
Dr. Perry Kendall reflects on 15 years as British Columbia’s Provincial Health Officer


Erb4Herb Legalize It campaign successfully reaches goals!

By | Drug Policy, Erb4Herb, Events, Political

Erb4Herb reaches goals and is retired December 31, 2015!

Erb4Herb Legalize It! campaign sponsored many national 420 events in 2013, 2014 and 2015. And also supported a get the vote out and vote Liberal campaign to help get rid of ex PM Stephan Harper. Harper is out of course and legalization is now coming as well. Both goals were reached successfully, The national Erb4Herb Legalize It! campaign came to an end last year after the Oct. 19, 2015 Liberal election win.

Bob successfully accomplished what he originally set out to do and even more.  He said he was going to donated one million dollars for legalization efforts and he donated more the one million dollars. Truth is he did what he said he was going to do and so much more for so many.

It is unfortunate a few people, out of thousands, feel they deserve more from Bob then he has already given to all so many. Which has lead to one or more person(s) insisting on making up complete nonsense to suit their needs at the time. Taking pleasure in wasting other peoples valuable time and energies on complete made up nonsense?

We hope this explains Erb4Herb actual past efforts and actual current position.

Erb4Herb

KF420.ca

Written by Keith Fagin April 28, 2016

All in an effort to help others understand maybe see the following recent news report on CTV News.

Shaw TV – Calgary Now and Alberta 420 discuss cannabis

By | Drug Policy, News Media

Thursday, April 14, 2016 @ 7:00 PM MDT

Calgary Now is a taped weekly show and is rebroadcast through out the week.
Shaw TV Calgary Channel 10 current schedule week is April 11 – 17

Calgary Now Show next dates and times
April 15 – 5:30am, 10:30am, 7:00pm
April 16 – 12:30am, 8:30am, 7:00pm
April 17 – 8:30am, 7:00pm

Don’t have access to Shaw TV Calgary Channel 10 then see
http://livestream.com/shawtvcalgary/channel

at the above times.

Calgary Now – Shaw TV Calgary Channel 10

Calgary Now – Facebook

Calgary Now – YouTube

Calgary Now – Twitter

Marijuana Billboard Hits Ottawa

By | Drug Policy, Political

MARIJUANA BILLBOARD HITS OTTAWAA new billboard will be going up in Ottawa tomorrow, calling on Trudeau to stop arrests…

Posted by Dana Larsen on Wednesday, 30 March 2016


Liberal government to respect Allard federal court ruling!

By | Drug Policy, Political
Medical Growing OK!

Federal Health Minister Jane Philpott said the Liberal government will not appeal the February 24, 2016 Allard v. Canada Federal Court decision that allows patients to grow their own medical cannabis.
“We will respect the decision of the federal court and as such we are now in a situation where we have responsibility to address the Marihuana for Medical Purposes Regulations and they will be amended accordingly in order to address the concerns of the court.”

Federal Court Justice Michael Phelan February 24 ruling included,
“The access restrictions did not prove to reduce risk to health and safety or to improve access to marijuana — the purported objectives of the regulation,”
“In sum, the law goes too far and interferes with some conduct that bears no connection to its objectives.”
“Many ‘expert’ witnesses were so imbued with a belief for or against marijuana — almost a religious fervour — that the court had to approach such evidence with a significant degree of caution and scepticism,”
John Conroy, Kirk Tousaw and others lead to the Justice Phelan ruling in affect crushing decades old complete nonsense reefer madness propaganda kept alive by several corrupt people!

If the Liberals continue to be responsible politicians by respecting the science and evidence and using same in their decision making they should allow all Canadians 18+ that are currently allowed to grow 15 kg of tobacco per year also grow the same amount of cannabis.
Growing 15 kg of tobacco per year for adult personal use is currently allowed in Canada,
“the quantity of tobacco or cigars manufactured in any year does not exceed 15 kg for the individual and each member of the individual’s family who resides with the individual and who is 18 years of age or older.”
Excise Act, 2001
Federal laws of Canada.
Marginal note:Exception —
(3) An individual who is not a tobacco licensee may manufacture manufactured tobacco or cigars
(a) from packaged raw leaf tobacco or manufactured tobacco on which the duty has been paid, if the tobacco or cigars are for their personal use; or
(b) from raw leaf tobacco grown on land on which the individual resides, if
(i) the tobacco or cigars are for their personal use or that of the members of their family who reside with the individual and who are 18 years of age or older, and
(ii) the quantity of tobacco or cigars manufactured in any year does not exceed 15 kg for the individual and each member of the individual’s family who resides with the individual and who is 18 years of age or older.
2002, c. 22, s. 25;
2007, c. 18, s. 74.